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Carmencitta-Victoria Woodhull; a women rights’ activist
Carmencitta-Victoria Woodhull; a women rights’ activist

For those of you who do not know her, Victoria Woodhull was an activist, spiritualist, politician as well as an author. Moreover, she was the first woman to run for the presidency of the United States. In fact, Victoria spent a big part of her life being a women rights’ activist.

Carmencitta-Victoria Woodhull; a women rights’ activist
Carmencitta-Victoria Woodhull; a women rights’ activist

 “I come before you to declare that my sex are entitled to the inalienable right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”

—Victoria Woodhull

Synopsis

Victoria Woodhull was born in Homer, Ohio, on September 23, 1838. As an activist, in 1870, she created Woodhull and Claflin’s Weekly, that helped her express her ideas on a variety of activist topics. The creation was a radical publication. Moreover, the journal used to also publish the first English translation of Karl Marx’s The Communist Manifesto. Moreover, Victoria, in 1872, ran for the U.S. presidency on the Equal Rights Party. Woodhull later moved to England and wrote more activist works. In 1927, she died in England.

Women’s rights activist

Woodhull was a strong supporter of women’s rights. Moreover, she used to often speak in public on behalf of women’s suffrage, while addressing the Congress on the issue. In fact, Victoria was always seeking to become more politically active, in order to establish the Equal Rights Party. After a while, she ran for the U.S. presidency on the political group’s ticket in 1872.

Carmencitta-Victoria Woodhull; a women rights’ activist
Carmencitta-Victoria Woodhull; a women rights’ activist

Due to her many relationships and radical ideas, Victoria Woodhull became a target for public scrutiny. In fact, the first time she got married was when she was only 15 years old, at that time, she got married to Canning Woodhull and the couple had two children. After a while, they got divorced, and Woodhull got married twice more. Moreover, she was reported to have multiple relationships. Her public remarks about sexuality and social reforms were also held against her. And her support of socialism—a political and economic philosophy that was considered radical at the time—may have alienated some, as well

 

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